Asplenium - Aspleniaceae

Asplenium linckii Kuhn

Photo: P. Ballings
Zimbabwe

Photo: P. Ballings
Zimbabwe

 

 

 

 

Synonyms

Asplenium daubenberghii Rosenst.
Asplenium albersii Hieron var. eickii Hieron.
Asplenium decompositum Peter

Common name

Description

Rhizome shortly creeping to suberect, up to 5 mm diameter; rhizome scales up to 6 x 0.3-1 mm, shiny brown, lanceolate to narrowly triangular in outline, entire, apex gradually tapering to a point and ending in a hair-tip. Fronds tufted or shortly spaced, not proliferous, arching, firmly herbaceous. Stipe 9-40 cm, matt brown to black, subglabrous above, base with scales similar to rhizome. Lamina (8-)11-33(-60) × (3-)10-27 cm, 3-pinnate to 5-pinnatifid, ovate-triangular in outline, finely dissected, basal pinnae the largest, apex decrescent. Pinnae 15-20 pairs, broadly ovate-triangular in outline, up to 17 x 10 cm. Ultimate segments wedge-shaped or narrowly obcuneate, up to 8-10 x 2-4 mm, apex with doubly toothed-truncate margins with teeth to 2 mm long, hairless on both surfaces or sometimes with a few minute scales beneath. Sori 1-3 per ultimate segment, elliptic in outline, 1.5-6 mm long; indusium entire, linear, membranous, 0.3-0.4 mm wide.

Notes

Differs from similar species by sharply serrated apical margins and small pinnules.

Derivation

linckii: named after H.A. Linck, German physician and collector on the von der Decken expedition.

Habitat

Deep shade in evergreen forest.

Distribution worldwide

See African distribution.

Distribution in Africa

Burundi, Dem. Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Rwanda, Tanzania , Uganda, Zimbabwe.

Growth form

Epiphytic, lithophytic, terrestrial.

Literature

  • Beentje, H.J. (2008) Aspleniaceae. Flora of Tropical East Africa, Page 46. (Includes a picture).
  • Burrows, J.E. (1990) Southern African Ferns and Fern Allies. Frandsen, Sandton. Pages 254 - 255. (Includes a picture).
  • Jacobsen, W.B.G. (1983) The Ferns and Fern Allies of Southern Africa. Butterworths, Durban and Pretoria. Page 370. (Includes a picture).
  • Roux, J.P. (2001) Conspectus of Southern African Pteridophyta. Southern African Botanical Diversity Network Report, 13 Page 167.
  • Roux, J.P. (2009) Synopsis of the Lycopodiophyta and Pteridophyta of Africa, Madagascar and neighbouring islands. Strelitzia 23, South African National Biodiversity Institute, Pretoria. Page 89.
  • Schelpe, E.A.C.L.E. (1970) Pteridophyta. Flora Zambesiaca, 0 Page 183.
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