Pellaea - Sinopteridaceae

Pellaea calomelanos (Sw.) Link var. calomelanos

Photo: P. Ballings
Zimbabwe

Photo: P. Ballings
Zimbabwe

Photo: P. Ballings
Zimbabwe

Photo: P. Ballings
Zimbabwe

Photo: P. Ballings
Zimbabwe

Photo: P. Ballings
Zimbabwe

Photo: P. Ballings
Zimbabwe

Photo: P. Ballings
Zimbabwe

Photo: P. Ballings
Zimbabwe

Photo: P. Ballings
Zimbabwe

Photo: P. Ballings
Zimbabwe

 

 

 

 

Synonyms

Pellaea hastata sensu Sim
Allosorus calomelanos (Sw.) C. Presl.
Pteris calomelanos Sw.
Notholaena calomelanos (Sw.) Keyserl.
Pteris hastata sensu Thunb.

Common name

Kabovora Mumvuriwedombo

Description

Rhizome erect to shortly creeping, c. 6 mm in diameter; rhizome scales linear-lanceolate in outline, apex slowly tapering to a point, margins pale, up to 10 mm long, black. Fronds monomorphic, tufted, erect to arching, 5-50 cm tall, coriaceous. Stipe 1-16(-30) cm long, round, black, very shining, hairless or finely set with orange-brown short hairs on the upper surface, sometimes with a few scales similar to the rhizome scales near the base, old stipe bases present. Lamina mostly 2-pinnate, occasionally 3-pinnate on the lower pinnae, ovate -lanceolate to narrowly triangular in outline, 10-43 × 2.5-25 cm; pinnae 7-12 pairs, opposite to slightly alternate, oblong-ovate in outline, 1.5-6 cm long; pinnules less than 2 cm long, rounded to broadly hastate, with 3-5 acute to rounded points, articulated, petiolate, grey to bluish green above, paler below, hairless; venetion free, hardly visible; rhachis and secondary rhachis shiny black, hairless or finely set with orange-brown short hairs on the upper surface. Sori borne in a continuous ridge along the margins, indusium continuous, entire, membranous.

Notes

The rounded to broadly hastate pinnules, with typically 3-5 acute to rounded points, a grey-green colour and thick texture make this species easy to recognize. P. calomelanos var. swynnertoniana has larger fronds and pinnules that are more than 2 cm long; it is restricted to the east and southern parts of Zimbabwe.

Derivation

kalos: pretty, melanos: dark; an allusion to the glossy black stipe and rhachis of the plant.

Habitat

On rocky outcrops in woodland, dense bushland and grassland, favouring warm conditions in both dry and wet climates.

Distribution worldwide

Africa, Madagascar, Comoro Isl., Mascarene Isl., nothern India, northeastern Spain.

Distribution in Africa

Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Dem. Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan and South Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania , Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Growth form

Lithophytic, terrestrial.

Literature

  • Burrows, J.E. (1990) Southern African Ferns and Fern Allies. Frandsen, Sandton. Pages 176 - 177. (Includes a picture).
  • Crouch, N.R., Klopper, R.R., Burrows, J.E. & Burrows, S.M. (2011) Ferns of Southern Africa, A comprehensive guide. Struik Nature. Pages 418 - 419. (Includes a picture).
  • Jacobsen, W.B.G. (1983) The Ferns and Fern Allies of Southern Africa. Butterworths, Durban and Pretoria. Pages 277 - 279. (Includes a picture).
  • Kornas, J. (1979) Distribution and ecology of the Pteridophytes in Zambia. Polska Akademia Nauk Wydzial II Nauk Biologicznych. Pages 53 - 54.
  • Roux, J.P. (2001) Conspectus of Southern African Pteridophyta. Southern African Botanical Diversity Network Report, 13 Pages 70 - 71. (Includes a picture).
  • Roux, J.P. (2009) Synopsis of the Lycopodiophyta and Pteridophyta of Africa, Madagascar and neighbouring islands. Strelitzia 23, South African National Biodiversity Institute, Pretoria. Page 189.
  • Schelpe, E.A.C.L.E. (1970) Pteridophyta. Flora Zambesiaca, 0 Pages 132 - 133.
  • Verdcourt, B. (2002) Adiantaceae. Flora of Tropical East Africa, Pages 16 - 17.
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