Cheilanthes - Sinopteridaceae

Cheilanthes quadripinnata (Forssk.) Kuhn

Photo: P. Ballings
Zimbabwe

Photo: P. Ballings
South Africa

Photo: P. Ballings
Zimbabwe

Photo: P. Ballings
South Africa

Photo: P. Ballings
South Africa

Photo: P. Ballings
South Africa

Photo: P. Ballings
Zimbabwe

Photo: P. Ballings
Zimbabwe

 

 

 

 

Synonyms

Pellaea consobrina Kunze
Pellaea quadripinnata (Forssk.) Prantl
Allosorus quadripinnatus (Forssk.) C.Presl.
Pteridella quadripinnata (Forssk.) Mett. ex Kuhn
Cheilanthes atherstonii Hook.
Pteris quadripinnata Forssk.

Common name

Description

Rhizome short, creeping, 6-7 mm in diameter; rhizome scales narrowly lanceolate to linear in outline, apex slowly tapering to a point, margin (sub)entire, up to 10 mm long, some pale brown, others with black central stripe and pale margins. Fronds monomorphic, tufted, up to 120 cm tall, erect to arching, coracious. Stipe up to 45 cm long, about 1.2 times the length of the lamina, castaneous to blackish, shiny, shallowly grooved in the upper part, hairless at maturity but set with long, reddish brown hairlike, narrow scales at the base. Lamina 4-pinnatifid to 5-pinnate on the basal pinnae, triangular or pentagonal in outline, 20-60 × 14-40 cm; lower pinnae ascending, deltate, basiscopically developed, with triangular, pinnatifid apex, uppermost pinnae pinnatifid; ultimate segments oblong, rounded to pointed, both surfaces hairless, lobed and broader when sterile, narrow and (sub)entire when fertile; venation free, obscure above except for midrib; rhachis and secondary rhachis castaneous, grooved, hairless. Sori linear, marginal, continuous except for the extreme apices and sinuses; indusium continuous, entire to erose, membranous.

Notes

May be confused with C. viridis var. viridis which is less divided (lamina 2- to 3-pinnate), has weakly developed basiscopically basal pinnae and veins that are distinct on the upper surface.

Derivation

quadripinnata: 4-pinnate, the fronds are divided four times.

Habitat

Around boulders and among tall grasses, rocks by streams, banks and wet bare soil by rivers, alpine meadows, scrub, forest margins, in grassland, in light shade or full sun.

Distribution worldwide

Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius and the Comoro islands.

Distribution in Africa

Cameroon, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, South Africa, Sudan and South Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania , Uganda, Zimbabwe.

Growth form

Lithophytic, terrestrial.

Literature

  • Burrows, J.E. (1990) Southern African Ferns and Fern Allies. Frandsen, Sandton. Page 149. (Includes a picture).
  • Crouch, N.R., Klopper, R.R., Burrows, J.E. & Burrows, S.M. (2011) Ferns of Southern Africa, A comprehensive guide. Struik Nature. Pages 396 - 397. (Includes a picture).
  • Jacobsen, W.B.G. (1983) The Ferns and Fern Allies of Southern Africa. Butterworths, Durban and Pretoria. Pages 288 - 290. as P. quadripinnata (Forsk.) Prantl. (Includes a picture).
  • Roux, J.P. (2009) Synopsis of the Lycopodiophyta and Pteridophyta of Africa, Madagascar and neighbouring islands. Strelitzia 23, South African National Biodiversity Institute, Pretoria. Page 185.
  • Roux, J.P. (2001) Conspectus of Southern African Pteridophyta. Southern African Botanical Diversity Network Report, 13 Page 66.
  • Schelpe, E.A.C.L.E. (1970) Pteridophyta. Flora Zambesiaca, 0 Pages 133 - 134. as P. quadripinnata (Forsk.) Prantl. (Includes a picture).
  • Verdcourt, B. (2002) Adiantaceae. Flora of Tropical East Africa, Pages 21 - 23. As Pellaea quadripinnata (Forssk.) Prantl. (Includes a picture).
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