Mohria - Anemiaceae

Mohria vestita Baker

Photo: BT. Wursten
Zimbabwe

Photo: BT. Wursten
Mozambique

Photo: BT. Wursten
Mozambique

Photo: P. Ballings
Zimbabwe

Photo: P. Ballings
Zimbabwe

 

 

 

 

Synonyms

Mohria caffrorum (L.) Desv. var. vestida (Baker) F.Ballard

Common name

Description

Rhizome creeping, short, irregurlarly branched, up to 8(-10) mm in diameter; rhizome scales pale to chestnut brown, up to 1.7-7 mm long, ovate-lanceolate in outline, margin entire. Fronds closely spaced, yellow-green, erect, slightly dimorphic with fertile fronds longer than sterile fronds. Stipe 2-13.2 cm long, basally chestnut coloured, apically strawcoloured, set with hairs and scales, becoming glabrous at maturity. Lamina herbaceous to thinly coriaceous, up to 57 x 11 cm, erect, narrowly elliptic to narrowly oblanceolate in outline,  2-pinnatifid to 3-pinnatifid, with 10-29 pairs of pinnae. Pinnae above sparsely hairy on secondary rachis, below with hairs and long narrow scales; pinnule margins strongly toothed. Rhachis sparsely to densely set with scales; secondary rhachis below with hairs and scales, upper surface with hairs. Sori submarginal, partly covered by the reflexed pinnule margin, exindusiate.    

Notes

Difficult to distinguish from M. nudiuscula . M. vestita. has slightly more hairy pinnae, especially on the upper surface, and more strongly toothed margins. M. vestita is characterized by the short stipe/lamina ratio, the reduction in size of the pinnae towards the lamina base, hairs on the upper lamina surface are confined to the secondary rhachis and veins, twisted scales on the lower lamina surface are also confined to the secondary rhachis and veins.

Derivation

vestita: clothed, referring to hair and scales on the plant; a character, however, shared by all species of Mohria.

Habitat

Rocky places in grassveld or near waterfalls, mist forest, roadside-banks.

Distribution worldwide

Africa, Madagascar

Distribution in Africa

Angola, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania , Zimbabwe.

Growth form

Lithophytic, terrestrial.

Literature

  • Burrows, J.E. (1990) Southern African Ferns and Fern Allies. Frandsen, Sandton. Pages 63 - 64. Description of M. caffrorum! Revision by J.P. Roux: M. caffrorum now restricted to S.A., M. vestita and M. nudiuscula new species for Zimbabwe. (Includes a picture).
  • Crouch, N.R., Klopper, R.R., Burrows, J.E. & Burrows, S.M. (2011) Ferns of Southern Africa, A comprehensive guide. Struik Nature. Pages 206 - 207. (Includes a picture).
  • Jacobsen, W.B.G. (1983) The Ferns and Fern Allies of Southern Africa. Butterworths, Durban and Pretoria. Pages 177 - 178. Description of M. caffrorum! Revision by J.P. Roux: M. caffrorum now restricted to S.A., M. vestita and M. nudiuscula new species for Zimbabwe. (Includes a picture).
  • Roux, J.P. (2001) Conspectus of Southern African Pteridophyta. Southern African Botanical Diversity Network Report, 13 Page 55.
  • Roux, J.P. (2009) Synopsis of the Lycopodiophyta and Pteridophyta of Africa, Madagascar and neighbouring islands. Strelitzia 23, South African National Biodiversity Institute, Pretoria. Page 53.
  • Roux, J.P. (1995) Systematic studies in the genus Mohria (Pteridophyta: Anemiaceae). VI. Taxonomic review. Bothalia, 25(1) Pages 7 - 9. (Includes a picture).
  • Schelpe, E.A.C.L.E. (1970) Pteridophyta. Flora Zambesiaca, 0 Pages 54 - 56. Description of M. caffrorum! Revision by J.P. Roux: M. caffrorum now restricted to S.A., M. vestita and M. nudiuscula new species for Zimbabwe. (Includes a picture).
  • Verdcourt, B. (2000) Schizaeaceae. Flora of Tropical East Africa, Pages 7 - 8.
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